Video

Here’s a video introduction to the mill town of Furnass

All That Will Remain

All That Will Remain — The latest of Richard Snodgrass’ Books of Furnass Series. To learn more about All That Will Remain click here.

The House with Round Windows

Available now, published by Carnegie Mellon University Press

THE HOUSE WITH ROUND WINDOWS — A Memoir by Richard Snodgrass

Click HERE for more information

“Succinct and poignant, The House with Round Windows is a memoir that packs an emotional and visual punch as it peeps into “the Brothers Snodgrass’s” family world.”
— FOREWARD Reviews, January/February 2022

Critical Acclaim

For Richard Snodgrass’ Novels

Richard
Snodgrass

Author &
Photographer

Richard Snodgrass’s short stories and essays have appeared in the New England Review/Bread Loaf Quarterly, South Dakota Review, California Review, Pittsburgh Quarterly, and elsewhere. He is also a master photographer who has been artist-in-residence at LightWorks (University of Syracuse) and at the Helene Wurlitzer Foundation in Taos, New Mexico. He is the recipient of a fellowship from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts.

In 1989, Viking published Snodgrass’s novel There’s Something in the Back Yard to critical acclaim: “Observe this mysterious book and be changed,” wrote Jack Stephens in the Washington Post Book World. Snodgrass is also the author of An Uncommon Field: The Flight 93 Temporary Memorial, published in September of 2011 by Carnegie Mellon University Press, and Kitchen Things: An Album of Vintage Utensils and Farm Kitchen Recipes, published in 2013 by Skyhorse and named one of the year’s “best books to get you thinking about food” by the Associated Press.

Richard Snodgrass lives in Pittsburgh, PA with his wife Marty and two indomitable female tuxedo cats, raised from feral kittens, named Frankie and Becca.

5 days ago

Richard Snodgrass
Novelist Ian McEwan: Writing is "a way of being""Lessons," the latest book by one of Britain's most successful writers, features a plotline inspired by a secret McEwan's mother kept from him until her death: that she'd given up a baby brother for adoption. ... See MoreSee Less
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3 weeks ago

Richard Snodgrass
Glenn Gould would always play on one particular chair, that positioned him very low in relation to the keyboard. The chair was made in Ontario and modified by his father (some inches were taken off the legs and small contraptions added to adjust the height). The normal height of a piano bench is 20 or 25 inches, but Gould’s was 14 inches off the floor and had a maple leaf carved into the backrest. ⁠Despite the seat eventually being broken, with only a scrap of leather stretched over it, Gould brought it with him wherever he played, whether he was at home, in the recording studio or on tour. The squeaking and creaking of the chair drove the sound technicians to the brink of despair, but this made less noise than Gould singing along as he played. Apparently conductors also needed plenty of patience when Gould tinkered around with the chair with the same passion as a racing driver fine-tuning his car.⁠ Sony Classical ... See MoreSee Less
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1 month ago

Richard Snodgrass
Glenn Gould Essentials | Listen on Apple Music ... See MoreSee Less
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1 month ago

Richard Snodgrass
What the ding-dong happened to Facebook? All I get in my feed are from pages, nothing of people I know. ... See MoreSee Less
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