Video

Here’s a video introduction to the mill town of Furnass

All That Will Remain

All That Will Remain — The latest of Richard Snodgrass’ Books of Furnass Series. To learn more about All That Will Remain click here.

The House with Round Windows

Available now, published by Carnegie Mellon University Press

THE HOUSE WITH ROUND WINDOWS — A Memoir by Richard Snodgrass

Click HERE for more information

“Succinct and poignant, The House with Round Windows is a memoir that packs an emotional and visual punch as it peeps into “the Brothers Snodgrass’s” family world.”
— FOREWARD Reviews, January/February 2022

Critical Acclaim

For Richard Snodgrass’ Novels

Richard
Snodgrass

Author &
Photographer

Richard Snodgrass’s short stories and essays have appeared in the New England Review/Bread Loaf Quarterly, South Dakota Review, California Review, Pittsburgh Quarterly, and elsewhere. He is also a master photographer who has been artist-in-residence at LightWorks (University of Syracuse) and at the Helene Wurlitzer Foundation in Taos, New Mexico. He is the recipient of a fellowship from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts.

In 1989, Viking published Snodgrass’s novel There’s Something in the Back Yard to critical acclaim: “Observe this mysterious book and be changed,” wrote Jack Stephens in the Washington Post Book World. Snodgrass is also the author of An Uncommon Field: The Flight 93 Temporary Memorial, published in September of 2011 by Carnegie Mellon University Press, and Kitchen Things: An Album of Vintage Utensils and Farm Kitchen Recipes, published in 2013 by Skyhorse and named one of the year’s “best books to get you thinking about food” by the Associated Press.

Richard Snodgrass lives in Pittsburgh, PA with his wife Marty and two indomitable female tuxedo cats, raised from feral kittens, named Frankie and Becca.

3 days ago

Richard Snodgrass
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4 days ago

Richard Snodgrass
"Boats at Shinagawa, Night", c. 1930s, a vertical ōban by Tsuchiya Kōitsu (土屋光逸) a.k.a. Fūkō Raisan (風光礼讃, 1870 – 1949), an ukiyo-e artist from Hamamatsu City (浜松市) in Shizuoka Prefecture (静岡県), who lived from the Meiji period to the Shōwa period. ... See MoreSee Less
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4 days ago

Richard Snodgrass
"Moon over the Arakawa [in Akabane]" (荒川の月[赤羽], Arakawa no Tsuki [Akabane]), a major river which flows from Saitama Prefecture and through Tokyo, 1929 (Shôwa 4), by Kawase Hasui (川瀬 巴水, 1883–1957), a vertical ôban from the series "Twenty Views of Tokyo" (東京二十景, Tôkyô nijûkei). Dimensions: 38.3 x 26 cm (15 1/16 x 10 1/4 inches).Kawase Hasui was a prominent designer of the shin-hanga (新版画, new prints) art movement, whose artists depicted traditional subjects with a style influenced by Western art. Like many earlier ukiyo-e prints, Hasui's works were commonly landscapes, but displayed atmospheric effects and natural lighting.Hasui designed approximately 620 prints over a career that spanned nearly forty years, often working closely with Watanabe Shôzaburô, who was another major figure behind the success of the shin-hanga movement. Towards the end of his life the government recognised Hasui as a Living National Treasure for his contribution to Japanese culture. ... See MoreSee Less
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4 days ago

Richard Snodgrass
"Early Summer Rain, Arakawa" [in Tokyo] a.k.a. "Arakawa River in May Rain" (皐月雨、荒川, Satsuki-ame, Arakawa), according to the lunar calendar, making this a June image, a 1932 ōban by Kawase Hasui (川瀬 巴水, 1883-1957), one of modern Japan's most important and prolific printmakers, published by Watanabe Shôzaburô.June usually has long rainy days in Japan, today presently being no exception to the rule!Kawase Hasui was a prominent designer of the shin-hanga (新版画, new prints) art movement, whose artists depicted traditional subjects with a style influenced by Western art. Like many earlier ukiyo-e prints, Hasui's works were commonly landscapes, but displayed atmospheric effects and natural lighting.Hasui designed approximately 620 prints over a career that spanned nearly forty years, often working closely with Watanabe Shôzaburô, who was another major figure behind the success of the shin-hanga movement. Towards the end of his life the government recognised Hasui as a Living National Treasure for his contribution to Japanese culture. ... See MoreSee Less
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